Chamber of Horrors: Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural, Table of Contents

CHMBRFHRRR1984Table of Contents

9 • Wood • (1976) • novelette by Robert Aickman
28 • The Bird • (1916) • short story by Thomas Burke
34 • A Thing About Machines • (1961) • short story by Rod Serling
51 • A Woman Seldom Found • (1956) • short story by William Sansom
54 • The Squaw • (1893) • short story by Bram Stoker
64 • The Cloth of Madness • (1920) • novelette by Seabury Quinn
83 • The Sea-Raiders • (1896) • short story by H. G. Wells
91 • The Dunwich Horror • [Cthulhu Mythos] • (1929) • novelette by H. P. Lovecraft
125 • Dad • (1976) • short story by John Blackburn
129 • The Cold Embrace • (1862) • short story by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [as by Miss Braddon]
137 • Royal Jelly • (1959) • novelette by Roald Dahl
158 • The Boarded Window • (1889) • short story by Ambrose Bierce
162 • Earth to Earth • (1955) • short story by Robert Graves
166 • A Warning to the Curious • (1925) • short story by M. R. James
179 • The Night of the Tiger • (1978) • short story by Stephen King
190 • The Interruption • (1925) • short story by W. W. Jacobs
200 • Back from the Grave • (1958) • short story by Robert Silverberg
210 • The Derelict • (1912) • novelette by William Hope Hodgson
230 • Vendetta • (1923) • short story by Guy de Maupassant (trans. of Une vendetta 1883)
234 • Edifice Complex • (1958) • short story by Robert Bloch
242 • The Red Lodge • (1928) • short story by H. Russell Wakefield
252 • Mary Postgate • (1915) • short story by Rudyard Kipling
264 • The Cradle Demon • (1978) • short story by R. Chetwynd-Hayes
270 • The Horror of Abbot’s Grange • (1936) • short story by Frederick Cowles
283 • Sredni Vashtar • (1911) • short story by Saki
287 • The Wall • (1976) • short story by Robert Haining
296 • An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street • (1853) • novelette by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu [as by J. Sheridan Le Fanu]
313 • The Whining • (1974) • short story by Ramsey Campbell
319 • Berenice • (1835) • short story by Edgar Allan Poe (variant of Berenice—A Tale)
326 • The Finless Death • (1921) • short story by R. E. Vernède
335 • And the Dead Spake • (1922) • short story by E. F. Benson (variant of “And the Dead Spake …”)

102 Classic Stories of Horror, TOC

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Table of Contents

1.The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
2.Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
3.The Shunned House by H. P. Lovecraft
4.The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
5.Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
6.Southern Horrors by Ida B. Wells-Barnett
7.The Monkey’s Paw by W. W. Jacobs
8.The Vampire by John William Polidori
9.The Great God Pan by Arthur Machen
10.The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce
11.The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe
12.The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
13.Dracula’s Guest by Bram Stoker
14.The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe
15.Lair of the White Worm by Bram Stoker
16.Four Weird Tales by Algernon Blackwood
17.The Willows by Algernon Blackwood
18.The House of the Vampire by George Sylvester Viereck
19.The Parasite by Arthur Conan Doyle
20. A Thin Ghost and Others by M. R. James
21.Clarimonde by Théophile Gautier
22.The Book of Were-Wolves by S. Baring-Gould
23.The Mummy’s Foot by Théophile Gautier
24.The Mysterious Murder of Pearl Bryan by Unknown
25.The Evil Guest by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
26.The Ghost Ship by Richard Middleton
27.The Parenticide Club by Ambrose Bierce
28.Three More John Silence Stories by Algernon Blackwood
29.The Golgotha Dancers by Manly Wade Wellman
30. Each Man Kills by Victoria Glad
31.The Invaders by Benjamin Ferris
32.The Garden of Survival by Algernon Blackwood
33.The Haunted and the Haunters by Edward Bulwer Lytton
34.There is a Reaper … by Charles V. De Vet
35.The Room in the Dragon Volant by Le Fanu
36.The Monster by S. M. Tenneshaw
37.The Waif Woman by Robert Louis Stevenson
38.The Return Of The Soul by Robert Hichens
39.The White Feather Hex by Don Peterson
40. The Herriges Horror in Philadelphia by Anonymous
41.Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by M. R. James
42.By the Waters of Paradise by F. MARION CRAWFORD
43.The Shadows on the Wall by MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN
44.The Corpus Delicti by MELVILLE D. POST
45.An Heiress from Redhorse by AMBROSE BIERCE
46.The Man and the Snake by AMBROSE BIERCE
47.The Oblong Box by EDGAR ALLAN POE
48.The Gold-Bug by EDGAR ALLAN POE
49.Wolfert Webber, or Golden Dreams by WASHINGTON IRVING
50.Adventure of the Black Fisherman by WASHINGTON IRVING
51.Wieland’s Madness by CHARLES BROCKDEN BROWN
52.The Golden Ingot by FITZJAMES O’BRIEN
53.My Wife’s Tempter by FITZJAMES O’BRIEN
54.The Minister’s Black Veil NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
55.Horror: A True Tale by Anonymous
56.The Unknown Quantity by Anonymous
57.The Armless Manby Anonymous
58.The Tomtom Clue by Anonymous
59.The Case of Sir Alister Moeran by Anonymous
60.The Kiss by Anonymous
61.The Goth by Anonymous
62.The Last Ascent by Anonymous
63.The Terror by Night by Anonymous
64.The Tragedy at the “Loup Noir” by Anonymous
65.THE PHANTOM ‘RICKSHAW by R. Kipling
66.MY OWN TRUE GHOST STORY
67.THE STRANGE RIDE OF MORROWBIE JUKES
68.THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING
69.”THE FINEST STORY IN THE WORLD”
70. THE EMPTY HOUSE by Algernon Blackwood
71.A HAUNTED ISLAND
72.A CASE OF EAVESDROPPING
73.KEEPING HIS PROMISE
74.WITH INTENT TO STEAL
75.THE WOOD OF THE DEAD
76.SMITH: AN EPISODE IN A LODGING-HOUSE
77.A SUSPICIOUS GIFT
78.THE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF A PRIVATE SECRETARY IN NEW YORK
79.SKELETON LAKE: AN EPISODE IN CAMP
80. THE BOLTED DOOR By Edith Wharton
81.HIS FATHER’S SON
82.THE DAUNT DIANA
83.THE DEBT
84.FULL CIRCLE
85.THE LEGEND
86.THE EYES
87.THE BLOND BEAST
88.AFTERWARD
89.THE LETTERS
90. FILMER by H. G. Wells
91.THE MAGIC SHOP
92.THE VALLEY OF SPIDERS
93.THE TRUTH ABOUT PYECRAFT
94.MR. SKELMERSDALE IN FAIRYLAND
95.THE STORY OF THE INEXPERIENCED GHOST
96.JIMMY GOGGLES THE GOD
97.THE NEW ACCELERATOR
98.MR. LEDBETTER’S VACATION
99.THE STOLEN BODY
100.MR. BRISHER’S TREASURE
101.MISS WINCHELSEA’S HEART
102.A DREAM OF ARMAGEDDON

“The House of the Vampire” by George Sylvester Viereck

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“Belfry Haunt” by Joseph Vargo. (josephvargo.com)

The House of the Vampire

George Sylvester Viereck, 1907

I

The freakish little leader of the orchestra, newly imported from Sicily to New York, tossed his conductor’s wand excitedly through the air, drowning with musical thunders the hum of conversation and the clatter of plates.

Yet neither his apish demeanour nor the deafening noises that responded to every movement of his agile body detracted attention from the figure of Reginald Clarke and the young man at his side as they smilingly wound their way to the exit.

The boy’s expression was pleasant, with an inkling of wistfulness, while the soft glimmer of his lucid eyes betrayed the poet and the dreamer. The smile of Reginald Clarke was the smile of a conqueror. A suspicion of silver in his crown of dark hair only added dignity to his bearing, while the infinitely ramified lines above the heavy-set mouth spoke at once of subtlety and of strength. Without stretch of the imagination one might have likened him to a Roman cardinal of the days of the Borgias, who had miraculously stepped forth from the time-stained canvas and slipped into twentieth century evening-clothes.

With the affability of complete self-possession he nodded in response to greetings from all sides, inclining his head with special politeness to a young woman whose sea-blue eyes were riveted upon his features with a look of mingled hate and admiration.

The woman, disregarding his silent salutation, continued to stare at him wild-eyed, as a damned soul in purgatory might look at Satan passing in regal splendour through the seventy times sevenfold circles of hell.

Reginald Clarke walked on unconcernedly through the rows of gay diners, still smiling, affable, calm. But his companion bethought himself of certain rumours he had heard concerning Ethel Brandenbourg’s mad love for the man from whose features she could not even now turn her eyes. Evidently her passion was unreciprocated. It had not always been so. There was a time in her career, some years ago in Paris, when it was whispered that she had secretly married him and, not much later, obtained a divorce. The matter was never cleared up, as both preserved an uncompromising silence upon the subject of their matrimonial experience. Certain it was that, for a space, the genius of Reginald Clarke had completely dominated her brush, and that, ever since he had thrown her aside, her pictures were but plagiarisms of her former artistic self.

The cause of the rupture between them was a matter only of surmise; but the effect it had on the woman testified clearly to the remarkable power of Reginald Clarke. He had entered her life and, behold! the world was transfixed on her canvases in myriad hues of transcending radiance; he had passed from it, and with him vanished the brilliancy of her colouring, as at sunset the borrowed amber and gold fade from the face of the clouds.

The glamour of Clarke’s name may have partly explained the secret of his charm, but, even in circles where literary fame is no passport, he could, if he chose, exercise an almost terrible fascination. Subtle and profound, he had ransacked the coffers of mediæval dialecticians and plundered the arsenals of the Sophists. Many years later, when the vultures of misfortune had swooped down upon him, and his name was no longer mentioned without a sneer, he was still remembered in New York drawing-rooms as the man who had brought to perfection the art of talking. Even to dine with him was a liberal education.

Clarke’s marvellous conversational power was equalled only by his marvellous style. Ernest Fielding’s heart leaped in him at the thought that henceforth he would be privileged to live under one roof with the only writer of his generation who could lend to the English language the rich strength and rugged music of the Elizabethans.

Reginald Clarke was a master of many instruments. Milton’s mighty organ was no less obedient to his touch than the little lute of the troubadour. He was never the same; that was his strength. Clarke’s style possessed at once the chiselled chasteness of a Greek marble column and the elaborate deviltry of the late Renaissance. At times his winged words seemed to flutter down the page frantically like Baroque angels; at other times nothing could have more adequately described his manner than the timeless calm of the gaunt pyramids.

The two men had reached the street. Reginald wrapped his long spring coat round him.

“I shall expect you to-morrow at four,” he said.

The tone of his voice was deep and melodious, suggesting hidden depths and cadences.

“I shall be punctual.”

The younger man’s voice trembled as he spoke.

“I look forward to your coming with much pleasure. I am interested in you.”

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The Purrinton Tragedy: Augusta, 1806

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‘I came across a good story while doing some research on the Augusta area, just the type of stuff you ghost hunters out there love to hear about. According to the story, A James Purrington moved from Bowdoinham to a farm on the Belgrade road and subsequently massacred his family with an ax and the committed suicide with a razor. Just another in a long line of oddities coming out of that little burg on the Kennebec River. Have you ever noticed that Bowdoinham’s phone numbers start with 666? … Spooks a lurking behind every door, and a skeleton in every closet, as they say.

Stories like this one, and the Mary Knight murder I posted on a while back are just a few of the interesting events that have occurred across Maine throughout her history. These two excerpts are from a couple of different texts that touch upon this event. You can click on the links to read the story in the original publications from the 1800’s.

I found it particularly interesting that Purrintons body was buried near the road, with a mention that gossip claims that Bowdoin College had secretly exhumed the body and taken it to the college for scientific research. Did the college indeed take the body? Maybe, maybe not, but this story would make a good research project for those interested in these sorts of events in Maine history. A century and six years have passed since that tragic day, and we ask, could the spirits of those poor children and Betsy Purrinton still roam that farmhouse on the Belgrade road?

Read the full article here…

Source: The Purrinton Tragedy: Augusta, 1806

Ghostly Houses

The infamous Amityville Horror house (left), located on Ocean Avenue in Long Island, New York; and Raynham Hall (right), in Norfolk, England are two of the most haunted places on Earth.

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Amityville House

The house at Ocean Avenue in the Amityville area of Long Island was the setting of one of the most frightening demonic/ghostly infestations in history involving a family of five—the Lutz family—who stayed in the house, which they had just purchased, for a mere 28 days, before fleeing, taking nothing with them from the home except the clothes they were wearing at the time.

A nonfiction book by Jay Anson (September 1977) was a blockbuster best seller and has never been out of print; and the film, starring Margot Kidder and James Brolin, made in 1979, was also a big hit, and is still watched by new generations. There were a series of post-1979 sequels to the original film, and a scary remake in 2005 with Ryan Reynolds playing the part of Goerge Lutz).

Further Reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amityville_Horror

The Brown Lady of Raynham Hall

Raynham Hall, a country house in located Norfolk, has been the seat of the Townshend family for 300 years. It is famous for being the location of a rare ghost sighting, that of the “Brown Lady”, who was captured descending the central staircase in one of the most famous ghost photographs of all time (above, left).

According to legend, the “Brown Lady of Raynham Hall” (left) is the ghost of Lady Dorothy Walpole (right) (1686–1726), the sister of Robert Walpole who was the first Prime Minister of Britain. Dorothy was the second wife of Charles Townshend, who was notorious for his violent temper. The story goes that when Townshend discovered that his wife had committed adultery with Lord Wharton, he punished her by locking her in her rooms at Raynham Hall. (There is another story, according to Mary Wortley Montagu, which states that Lady Dorothy was, in fact, entrapped by the Countess of Wharton at Wharton’s house—where she had invited Dorothy to stay for a few days. knowing that her husband, Lord Wharton, with whom Dorothy had been intimately involved, would never want Dorothy to leave, not even to see her own children.) Lady Dorothy Walpole is said to have remained at Raynham Hall until her death in 1726 from smallpox.

Further Reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Lady_of_Raynham_Hall

Read more about haunted houses here: Ghostly Houses.

The “Old-Fashioned” Literary Ghost Story Has Risen from the Grave—The Fellow Travellers & Other Stories by Sheila Hodgson!

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I usually have trouble finding modern ghost stories I like. I prefer the longer, old style of prose from the past. But I am thrilled to discover this collection. Sheila Hodgson wrote these in the antiquated style, which seems to have been forgotten, unfortunately, or, worse, relegated to remain imprisoned in a specific time that we are now past. Here is an excerpt and the Contents of this 1998 collection. I haven’t yet discovered which story contains that thing with no eyes on the cover. 😬

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Villa Martine
The Turning Point
The Lodestone Childermass
The Backward Glance
The Boat Hook
The Fellow Travellers
The Hand of Gideon Chant
Echoes from the Abbey
Here Am I, Where Are You?
The Smile
Come, Follow!

Introduction

“It began in a pub near Shepherd’s Bush. Several of us, scriptwriters at Television Centre, had been debating why the ghost story is so much more effective on radio than on television; why unseen terrors prove far more alarming than explicit visual horrors. Even in the hands of such a master as Nigel Kneale, there is a real danger that once you show your haunting phantom, one or two people in the audience will fall about laughing.

What frightens you may strike me as ridiculous; what terrifies me may cause you to hoot with derision. Fear is personal. I am not talking here of mass panic, which is a different matter altogether —a kind of infectious hysteria —but rather of icy, isolated dread, the conviction that one is utterly alone yet something has gone bump in the night. As a very small child I got lost under the bedclothes, and to this day feel a horrid frisson every time I read ‘Oh, Whistle, and I’ll Come to You, My Lad’. That face of crumpled linen, you see.

As a result of our pub argument, I wrote to Broadcasting House suggesting that I adapt one of M. R. James’s stories for radio. I got a letter back saying thank you, they believed all the good ones had been done already. I checked with the Public Library. They were right.

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