“Witch-Compass”, a Horror Story by Graham Masterton … an Excerpt

AE89A34A-46D8-4738-A3A5-AE02E1D1B8DEOn his last night in Libreville, Paul went for a long aimless walk through the market. A heavy rainstorm had just passed over and the air was almost intolerably humid. He felt as if he had a hot Turkish towel wrapped around his head, and his shirt clung to his back. There were many things he would miss about Gabon, but the climate wasn’t one of them, and neither was the musty smell of tropical mold.

All along the Marché Rouge there were stalls heaped with bananas and plantains and cassava; as well as food-stands selling curried goat and thick maize porridge and spicy fish. The stalls were lit by an elaborate spider’s-web of electric cables, with naked bulbs dangling from them. Each stall was like a small, brightly colored theater, with the sweaty black faces of its actors wreathed in theatrical steam and smoke.

Paul passed them by, a tall rangy white man with short-cropped hair and round Oliver Goldsmith glasses, and already he was beginning to feel like a spectator, like somebody who no longer belonged here.

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House of John Proctor, Witchcraft Martyr, 1692, by Wm. P. Upham

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John Proctor House, Peabody, Massachusetts. (Public Domain)

House of John Proctor, Witchcraft Martyr, 1692

Wm. P. Upham

Peabody: Press of C. H. Shepard, 1904

[A paper read by William P. Upham at a meeting of the Peabody Historical Society at the Needham house, West Peabody, September 2nd., 1903.]

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Map showing the location of the John Proctor House used in Upham’s book. (Public Domain)

Note on John Proctor:

John Proctor was the first male accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials. He was accused in April of 1692 during his wife Elizabeth Proctor’s examination. At the time, the Proctor family was living on this farm, where Proctor also ran a tavern called the Proctor Tavern, in what was then the outskirts of Salem Village. After Proctor’s arrest, Sheriff George Corwin raided the farm and confiscated all of the beer, food and valuables on the property.

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John Proctor was found guilty on August 5 and executed on August 19, 1692 at or near Gallows Hill. Proctor’s family reportedly retrieved his body from the execution site and buried it on the northeast corner of the family farm. The farm was later passed down to Proctor’s son, Benjamin, and it remained in the family until the late 1800s. It is not known what happened to Proctor’s original house but there is another house still standing on the property that is often referred to as the John Proctor house despite the fact that historians believe it was built in the 1700s by Proctor’s son Thorndike Proctor. The house and the farm are privately owned.

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Transcriber’s Note: Sections of this text have been quoted from historical documents written with great variability in spelling and punctuation. These inconsistencies have been retained. A list of corrections made to the 1904 portions of this text can be found following this text.

It is now nearly forty years since I assisted my father, the late Charles W. Upham, in the preparation of his work on Salem Village and the Witchcraft tragedy of 1692, by collecting what information could be obtained from the records as to the people and their homes in that locality. In doing this I was enabled to construct a map showing the bounds of the grants and farms at that time. On that map is represented quite accurately the Downing Farm, so called, owned, in 1638, by Emanuel Downing, father of Sir George Downing, and occupied as tenant, in 1692, by John Procter, the victim of the witchcraft delusion. When I made the map I knew that John Procter at his death owned, as appears by the inventory of his estate, fifteen acres of land in Salem, but I was not able then to locate it with exactness. Lately, in making a more complete study of the records relating to the Downing farm and the surrounding lands I have learned the exact situation of the fifteen acre lot owned by him, and also that he had a house upon it as early as 1682 and until his death in 1692. It appears that this lot is the place where he was buried, according to the family tradition, although the knowledge as to its being once owned by him seems to have passed out of the neighborhood for more than a century.

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The Diary of Xander Tully, a Novella-in-Progress by Sanguine Woods, Coming Winter, 2018

22FE38E1-A688-4586-AA8C-B3C173D42767Dear Book Lovers and Ardent Readers,

RE: A quick note from the writer’s desk…

Greetings!

Working on my novella The Diary of Xander Tully. It is a frightening tale set in the years before America had become a nation, up in the woods of what is now the border between Michigan and Canada, where French-Canadian settlers have started a fledgling colony led by two old families.

Xander Tulley is a stranger here. His origins are not known to the community. But he is a clever man; he shows the world a practical and rational side; a lover of facts and the path they reveal to truth. But Tulley has other sides. He hails from a foreign land, across the sea. His people are tall, fair of hair and pale of skin. He appears as an artisan printer in the colony of River Raisin, where the villagers have a respect for the past and their heritage (one of the families traces its roots all the way back to a French king).

When Tulley becomes curious about a tale of an odd grouping of stones located in the deep woods that begin about a mile northeast of the village, he is drawn to the site. There is no visible path to the outcropping, and reaching it is difficult unless you know the woods, and the way. The stones circumscribe what appears to be a gash in the earth, an opening some five paces across at its widest. The villagers don‘t appear to know of the spot, its history, or the fact that a grove of trees surrounds the area in almost a perfect circle. They are deciduous trees, “evergreens”—-and they are the only trees in the wood that turn the color of glowing embers when autumn steals the light from summer and creeps toward the winter solstice.

The story of the woods is old. Some things—some geographies, secrets—-some stories—-lay quiet and undisturbed for a reason. Xander Tulley has been dreaming about the burning trees. His preoccupation with learning the history of the Wood leads him to seek out an indiginous tribe that once dwelt near the area, but has since moved higher north. It is in the tribe’s legends, wrapped tight within in an ancient language, that Tulley begins to see a story form in the forgotten shadows of time, one that once breathed life, and should now be left alone.

Xander Tulley reaches a proverbial fork in the road, where he may learn more about himself than he ever cared to know; and where he will be faced with making the hardest decision he will ever have to make.

Stay tuned for more!

SW

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The Witches MEGAPACK® — New Ebook of Horror Stories for $.99!

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Table of Contents

  1. Thou Shalt Not Suffer, by Matt Neil Hill
  2. No Holds Bard, by Adrian Cole
  3. Laying The Hairy Book, by Josh Reynolds
  4. Here Is Where Your Proud Waves Halt, by Erica Ruppert
  5. Vicious Circles, by Paul Dale Anderson
  6. Assorted Shades of Red, by Franklyn Searight
  7. Strange Days in Old Yandrissa, by John R. Fultz
  8. Fertility Rites, by Glynn Owen Barrass
  9. The Witch’s Heart, by Rachel Bolton
  10. Hag Race, by Andre E. Harewood
  11. Best Friend Becky, by Wayne Faust
  12. The Rat in the Rabbit Cage, by Ashley Dioses
  13. Two Spells, by Neva Bryan
  14. Pulled Over, by Paul Spears
  15. The Witch of Skur, by L.F. Falconer
  16. Cat and Mouse, by Duane Pesice
  17. Last of the Ashiptu, by Paul Lubaczewski
  18. Firestorm, by Richard H. Durisen
  19. The Witch of Pender, by John Linwood Grant
  20. The Nora Witch, by Brandon Jimison
  21. The Broken Witch, by Scott Hutchison

*Also includes: poetry by Maurits Zwankhuizen, Lucy A. Snyder, David F. Daumit, S.L. Edwards, Lori R. Lopez, Frederick J. Mayer, K.A. Opperman, Clay F. Johnson, Vonnie Winslow Crist, Oliver Smith, and Darla Klein.

Chamber of Horrors: Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural, Table of Contents

CHMBRFHRRR1984Table of Contents

9 • Wood • (1976) • novelette by Robert Aickman
28 • The Bird • (1916) • short story by Thomas Burke
34 • A Thing About Machines • (1961) • short story by Rod Serling
51 • A Woman Seldom Found • (1956) • short story by William Sansom
54 • The Squaw • (1893) • short story by Bram Stoker
64 • The Cloth of Madness • (1920) • novelette by Seabury Quinn
83 • The Sea-Raiders • (1896) • short story by H. G. Wells
91 • The Dunwich Horror • [Cthulhu Mythos] • (1929) • novelette by H. P. Lovecraft
125 • Dad • (1976) • short story by John Blackburn
129 • The Cold Embrace • (1862) • short story by Mary Elizabeth Braddon [as by Miss Braddon]
137 • Royal Jelly • (1959) • novelette by Roald Dahl
158 • The Boarded Window • (1889) • short story by Ambrose Bierce
162 • Earth to Earth • (1955) • short story by Robert Graves
166 • A Warning to the Curious • (1925) • short story by M. R. James
179 • The Night of the Tiger • (1978) • short story by Stephen King
190 • The Interruption • (1925) • short story by W. W. Jacobs
200 • Back from the Grave • (1958) • short story by Robert Silverberg
210 • The Derelict • (1912) • novelette by William Hope Hodgson
230 • Vendetta • (1923) • short story by Guy de Maupassant (trans. of Une vendetta 1883)
234 • Edifice Complex • (1958) • short story by Robert Bloch
242 • The Red Lodge • (1928) • short story by H. Russell Wakefield
252 • Mary Postgate • (1915) • short story by Rudyard Kipling
264 • The Cradle Demon • (1978) • short story by R. Chetwynd-Hayes
270 • The Horror of Abbot’s Grange • (1936) • short story by Frederick Cowles
283 • Sredni Vashtar • (1911) • short story by Saki
287 • The Wall • (1976) • short story by Robert Haining
296 • An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street • (1853) • novelette by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu [as by J. Sheridan Le Fanu]
313 • The Whining • (1974) • short story by Ramsey Campbell
319 • Berenice • (1835) • short story by Edgar Allan Poe (variant of Berenice—A Tale)
326 • The Finless Death • (1921) • short story by R. E. Vernède
335 • And the Dead Spake • (1922) • short story by E. F. Benson (variant of “And the Dead Spake …”)

102 Classic Stories of Horror, TOC

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Table of Contents

1.The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
2.Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
3.The Shunned House by H. P. Lovecraft
4.The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
5.Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
6.Southern Horrors by Ida B. Wells-Barnett
7.The Monkey’s Paw by W. W. Jacobs
8.The Vampire by John William Polidori
9.The Great God Pan by Arthur Machen
10.The Damned Thing by Ambrose Bierce
11.The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allan Poe
12.The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
13.Dracula’s Guest by Bram Stoker
14.The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe
15.Lair of the White Worm by Bram Stoker
16.Four Weird Tales by Algernon Blackwood
17.The Willows by Algernon Blackwood
18.The House of the Vampire by George Sylvester Viereck
19.The Parasite by Arthur Conan Doyle
20. A Thin Ghost and Others by M. R. James
21.Clarimonde by Théophile Gautier
22.The Book of Were-Wolves by S. Baring-Gould
23.The Mummy’s Foot by Théophile Gautier
24.The Mysterious Murder of Pearl Bryan by Unknown
25.The Evil Guest by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
26.The Ghost Ship by Richard Middleton
27.The Parenticide Club by Ambrose Bierce
28.Three More John Silence Stories by Algernon Blackwood
29.The Golgotha Dancers by Manly Wade Wellman
30. Each Man Kills by Victoria Glad
31.The Invaders by Benjamin Ferris
32.The Garden of Survival by Algernon Blackwood
33.The Haunted and the Haunters by Edward Bulwer Lytton
34.There is a Reaper … by Charles V. De Vet
35.The Room in the Dragon Volant by Le Fanu
36.The Monster by S. M. Tenneshaw
37.The Waif Woman by Robert Louis Stevenson
38.The Return Of The Soul by Robert Hichens
39.The White Feather Hex by Don Peterson
40. The Herriges Horror in Philadelphia by Anonymous
41.Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by M. R. James
42.By the Waters of Paradise by F. MARION CRAWFORD
43.The Shadows on the Wall by MARY E. WILKINS FREEMAN
44.The Corpus Delicti by MELVILLE D. POST
45.An Heiress from Redhorse by AMBROSE BIERCE
46.The Man and the Snake by AMBROSE BIERCE
47.The Oblong Box by EDGAR ALLAN POE
48.The Gold-Bug by EDGAR ALLAN POE
49.Wolfert Webber, or Golden Dreams by WASHINGTON IRVING
50.Adventure of the Black Fisherman by WASHINGTON IRVING
51.Wieland’s Madness by CHARLES BROCKDEN BROWN
52.The Golden Ingot by FITZJAMES O’BRIEN
53.My Wife’s Tempter by FITZJAMES O’BRIEN
54.The Minister’s Black Veil NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE
55.Horror: A True Tale by Anonymous
56.The Unknown Quantity by Anonymous
57.The Armless Manby Anonymous
58.The Tomtom Clue by Anonymous
59.The Case of Sir Alister Moeran by Anonymous
60.The Kiss by Anonymous
61.The Goth by Anonymous
62.The Last Ascent by Anonymous
63.The Terror by Night by Anonymous
64.The Tragedy at the “Loup Noir” by Anonymous
65.THE PHANTOM ‘RICKSHAW by R. Kipling
66.MY OWN TRUE GHOST STORY
67.THE STRANGE RIDE OF MORROWBIE JUKES
68.THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING
69.”THE FINEST STORY IN THE WORLD”
70. THE EMPTY HOUSE by Algernon Blackwood
71.A HAUNTED ISLAND
72.A CASE OF EAVESDROPPING
73.KEEPING HIS PROMISE
74.WITH INTENT TO STEAL
75.THE WOOD OF THE DEAD
76.SMITH: AN EPISODE IN A LODGING-HOUSE
77.A SUSPICIOUS GIFT
78.THE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF A PRIVATE SECRETARY IN NEW YORK
79.SKELETON LAKE: AN EPISODE IN CAMP
80. THE BOLTED DOOR By Edith Wharton
81.HIS FATHER’S SON
82.THE DAUNT DIANA
83.THE DEBT
84.FULL CIRCLE
85.THE LEGEND
86.THE EYES
87.THE BLOND BEAST
88.AFTERWARD
89.THE LETTERS
90. FILMER by H. G. Wells
91.THE MAGIC SHOP
92.THE VALLEY OF SPIDERS
93.THE TRUTH ABOUT PYECRAFT
94.MR. SKELMERSDALE IN FAIRYLAND
95.THE STORY OF THE INEXPERIENCED GHOST
96.JIMMY GOGGLES THE GOD
97.THE NEW ACCELERATOR
98.MR. LEDBETTER’S VACATION
99.THE STOLEN BODY
100.MR. BRISHER’S TREASURE
101.MISS WINCHELSEA’S HEART
102.A DREAM OF ARMAGEDDON

Why You Should Pray at Night…

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Black Masses occur at night because fewer people are praying during those hours, and prayers disrupt these rituals. Therefore, we ought to pray at night more in order to prevent these atrocious rites wherein the Eucharist is profaned on a nude woman who serves as the “altar” and is raped at the end of the Black Mass. It is even more imperative to pray on the nights of Satanic feasts (the nights comprising October 31/November 1, February 1/2, April 30/May 1).  (generationexorcistblog)