Manitou Man—An Anthology of Stories by Graham Masterton, TOC

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Table of Contents

9 • Introduction (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Matt Williams and Ray Clark
11 • Foreword (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Peter James
13 • Myths and Legends (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Ray Clark and Matt Williams
23 • Spirit-Jump • [Manitou / Harry Erksine] • (1996) • novelette by Graham Masterton
49 • Jack Be Quick • (1996) • novelette by Graham Masterton
61 • Fantasy Worlds & Parallel Existences (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Ray Clark and Matt Williams
71 • Evidence of Angels • (1995) • novelette by Graham Masterton

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“Witch-Compass”, a Horror Story by Graham Masterton … an Excerpt

AE89A34A-46D8-4738-A3A5-AE02E1D1B8DEOn his last night in Libreville, Paul went for a long aimless walk through the market. A heavy rainstorm had just passed over and the air was almost intolerably humid. He felt as if he had a hot Turkish towel wrapped around his head, and his shirt clung to his back. There were many things he would miss about Gabon, but the climate wasn’t one of them, and neither was the musty smell of tropical mold.

All along the Marché Rouge there were stalls heaped with bananas and plantains and cassava; as well as food-stands selling curried goat and thick maize porridge and spicy fish. The stalls were lit by an elaborate spider’s-web of electric cables, with naked bulbs dangling from them. Each stall was like a small, brightly colored theater, with the sweaty black faces of its actors wreathed in theatrical steam and smoke.

Paul passed them by, a tall rangy white man with short-cropped hair and round Oliver Goldsmith glasses, and already he was beginning to feel like a spectator, like somebody who no longer belonged here.

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“Thirst” a Horror Story by Gerald W. Page, an Excerpt…

‘“Hush,” said his mother. “A child your age shouldn’t even know about such a thing. They shouldn’t even let you see those picture shows and horror movies…”

The boy’s grandfather stopped eating and looked up at his daughter, the fork poised in mid-air above the beans that were his supper. “He ought to know. A boy lives this close to Overhill Mountain ought to know about the things that go on up there.”

“He won’t live here all his life,” she said. “He’ll get an education… You’ll see. He’ll go North to live.”

“But it’s daylight, Ma,” the boy said, courage bolstered by his grandfather’s words. “Everybody knows they crumbles up in daylight. I saw a movie where—”

“They don’t die in sunlight,” said the grandfather. “Sunlight robs their strength. They’re things of the night and have no strength in the day—but it doesn’t kill them if they aren’t exposed too long. How long, depends on how strong they are to begin with. But they do hate the sun. I think the reason they’re scared of crosses is that the holy things shine like the sun to them—”

“I don’t want my boy to know about them, Daddy.”

The old man went on, ignoring her. “They do have to go back to their grave, like in the movies, but it don’t kill them to spend a day away from it. It’s the need for that grave, though, that’s strong in them. That and the fear of the sunlight. Those are strong in them and only thing that’s any stronger is the Thirst.”’

– Gerald W. Page, “Thirst”—from The Year’s Best Horror Stories, Series II, ed. Richard Davis (Daw 1972)

The Diary of Xander Tully, a Novella-in-Progress by Sanguine Woods, Coming Winter, 2018

22FE38E1-A688-4586-AA8C-B3C173D42767Dear Book Lovers and Ardent Readers,

RE: A quick note from the writer’s desk…

Greetings!

Working on my novella The Diary of Xander Tully. It is a frightening tale set in the years before America had become a nation, up in the woods of what is now the border between Michigan and Canada, where French-Canadian settlers have started a fledgling colony led by two old families.

Xander Tulley is a stranger here. His origins are not known to the community. But he is a clever man; he shows the world a practical and rational side; a lover of facts and the path they reveal to truth. But Tulley has other sides. He hails from a foreign land, across the sea. His people are tall, fair of hair and pale of skin. He appears as an artisan printer in the colony of River Raisin, where the villagers have a respect for the past and their heritage (one of the families traces its roots all the way back to a French king).

When Tulley becomes curious about a tale of an odd grouping of stones located in the deep woods that begin about a mile northeast of the village, he is drawn to the site. There is no visible path to the outcropping, and reaching it is difficult unless you know the woods, and the way. The stones circumscribe what appears to be a gash in the earth, an opening some five paces across at its widest. The villagers don‘t appear to know of the spot, its history, or the fact that a grove of trees surrounds the area in almost a perfect circle. They are deciduous trees, “evergreens”—-and they are the only trees in the wood that turn the color of glowing embers when autumn steals the light from summer and creeps toward the winter solstice.

The story of the woods is old. Some things—some geographies, secrets—-some stories—-lay quiet and undisturbed for a reason. Xander Tulley has been dreaming about the burning trees. His preoccupation with learning the history of the Wood leads him to seek out an indiginous tribe that once dwelt near the area, but has since moved higher north. It is in the tribe’s legends, wrapped tight within in an ancient language, that Tulley begins to see a story form in the forgotten shadows of time, one that once breathed life, and should now be left alone.

Xander Tulley reaches a proverbial fork in the road, where he may learn more about himself than he ever cared to know; and where he will be faced with making the hardest decision he will ever have to make.

Stay tuned for more!

SW

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The Witches MEGAPACK® — New Ebook of Horror Stories for $.99!

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Table of Contents

  1. Thou Shalt Not Suffer, by Matt Neil Hill
  2. No Holds Bard, by Adrian Cole
  3. Laying The Hairy Book, by Josh Reynolds
  4. Here Is Where Your Proud Waves Halt, by Erica Ruppert
  5. Vicious Circles, by Paul Dale Anderson
  6. Assorted Shades of Red, by Franklyn Searight
  7. Strange Days in Old Yandrissa, by John R. Fultz
  8. Fertility Rites, by Glynn Owen Barrass
  9. The Witch’s Heart, by Rachel Bolton
  10. Hag Race, by Andre E. Harewood
  11. Best Friend Becky, by Wayne Faust
  12. The Rat in the Rabbit Cage, by Ashley Dioses
  13. Two Spells, by Neva Bryan
  14. Pulled Over, by Paul Spears
  15. The Witch of Skur, by L.F. Falconer
  16. Cat and Mouse, by Duane Pesice
  17. Last of the Ashiptu, by Paul Lubaczewski
  18. Firestorm, by Richard H. Durisen
  19. The Witch of Pender, by John Linwood Grant
  20. The Nora Witch, by Brandon Jimison
  21. The Broken Witch, by Scott Hutchison

*Also includes: poetry by Maurits Zwankhuizen, Lucy A. Snyder, David F. Daumit, S.L. Edwards, Lori R. Lopez, Frederick J. Mayer, K.A. Opperman, Clay F. Johnson, Vonnie Winslow Crist, Oliver Smith, and Darla Klein.

Horror x 40 — History’s Creepiest Book Covers! #1: I Am Legend by Richard Matheson…

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Richard Matheson, I Am Legend; Corgi Books 1960 edition

It’s not the violence or even the murdered woman that makes this cover creepy. It’s the hammer in the hand of the man standing over her, and the implication that he’s about to pound that stake straight into the ground.

A newer edition sported this 1997 cover (below); my favorite cover to date of Matheson’s vampire masterpiece.

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