Her Kind, a Poem by Anne Sexton

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Photographer unknown (Pinterest).

Her Kind

I have gone out, a possessed witch,
haunting the black air, braver at night;
dreaming evil, I have done my hitch
over the plain houses, light by light:
lonely thing, twelve-fingered, out of mind.
A woman like that is not a woman, quite.
I have been her kind.

I have found the warm caves in the woods,
filled them with skillets, carvings, shelves,
closets, silks, innumerable goods;
fixed the suppers for the worms and the elves:
whining, rearranging the disaligned.
A woman like that is misunderstood.
I have been her kind.

I have ridden in your cart, driver,
waved my nude arms at villages going by,
learning the last bright routes, survivor
where your flames still bite my thigh
and my ribs crack where your wheels wind.
A woman like that is not ashamed to die.
I have been her kind.

– Anne Sexton

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Insomniac—a Poem by Sanguine Woods, 2018

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O the blood-encrusted thoughts!
whirring like blades, wheeling
and whining through the
ambushed mind, unbeckoned;
unhindered, unheeded—how does one
pray to be emptied?
Sly little half-truths; those
brazen whole-truths, eyes
like coals, low to the burning;
“‘tis the hooded chill cloaks the fever!”
Old Wives’, you know;
smoldering blue at the gums…
tooth and blade, chew,
then whirrr; whirrr, then chew—
through the indigo watches
of the night.

(C)2018 Sanguine Woods

Manitou Man—An Anthology of Stories by Graham Masterton, TOC

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Table of Contents

9 • Introduction (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Matt Williams and Ray Clark
11 • Foreword (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Peter James
13 • Myths and Legends (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Ray Clark and Matt Williams
23 • Spirit-Jump • [Manitou / Harry Erksine] • (1996) • novelette by Graham Masterton
49 • Jack Be Quick • (1996) • novelette by Graham Masterton
61 • Fantasy Worlds & Parallel Existences (Manitou Man: The Worlds of Graham Masterton) • (1998) • essay by Ray Clark and Matt Williams
71 • Evidence of Angels • (1995) • novelette by Graham Masterton

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“Thirst” a Horror Story by Gerald W. Page, an Excerpt…

‘“Hush,” said his mother. “A child your age shouldn’t even know about such a thing. They shouldn’t even let you see those picture shows and horror movies…”

The boy’s grandfather stopped eating and looked up at his daughter, the fork poised in mid-air above the beans that were his supper. “He ought to know. A boy lives this close to Overhill Mountain ought to know about the things that go on up there.”

“He won’t live here all his life,” she said. “He’ll get an education… You’ll see. He’ll go North to live.”

“But it’s daylight, Ma,” the boy said, courage bolstered by his grandfather’s words. “Everybody knows they crumbles up in daylight. I saw a movie where—”

“They don’t die in sunlight,” said the grandfather. “Sunlight robs their strength. They’re things of the night and have no strength in the day—but it doesn’t kill them if they aren’t exposed too long. How long, depends on how strong they are to begin with. But they do hate the sun. I think the reason they’re scared of crosses is that the holy things shine like the sun to them—”

“I don’t want my boy to know about them, Daddy.”

The old man went on, ignoring her. “They do have to go back to their grave, like in the movies, but it don’t kill them to spend a day away from it. It’s the need for that grave, though, that’s strong in them. That and the fear of the sunlight. Those are strong in them and only thing that’s any stronger is the Thirst.”’

– Gerald W. Page, “Thirst”—from The Year’s Best Horror Stories, Series II, ed. Richard Davis (Daw 1972)

The Diary of Xander Tully, a Novella-in-Progress by Sanguine Woods, Coming Winter, 2018

22FE38E1-A688-4586-AA8C-B3C173D42767Dear Book Lovers and Ardent Readers,

RE: A quick note from the writer’s desk…

Greetings!

Working on my novella The Diary of Xander Tully. It is a frightening tale set in the years before America had become a nation, up in the woods of what is now the border between Michigan and Canada, where French-Canadian settlers have started a fledgling colony led by two old families.

Xander Tulley is a stranger here. His origins are not known to the community. But he is a clever man; he shows the world a practical and rational side; a lover of facts and the path they reveal to truth. But Tulley has other sides. He hails from a foreign land, across the sea. His people are tall, fair of hair and pale of skin. He appears as an artisan printer in the colony of River Raisin, where the villagers have a respect for the past and their heritage (one of the families traces its roots all the way back to a French king).

When Tulley becomes curious about a tale of an odd grouping of stones located in the deep woods that begin about a mile northeast of the village, he is drawn to the site. There is no visible path to the outcropping, and reaching it is difficult unless you know the woods, and the way. The stones circumscribe what appears to be a gash in the earth, an opening some five paces across at its widest. The villagers don‘t appear to know of the spot, its history, or the fact that a grove of trees surrounds the area in almost a perfect circle. They are deciduous trees, “evergreens”—-and they are the only trees in the wood that turn the color of glowing embers when autumn steals the light from summer and creeps toward the winter solstice.

The story of the woods is old. Some things—some geographies, secrets—-some stories—-lay quiet and undisturbed for a reason. Xander Tulley has been dreaming about the burning trees. His preoccupation with learning the history of the Wood leads him to seek out an indiginous tribe that once dwelt near the area, but has since moved higher north. It is in the tribe’s legends, wrapped tight within in an ancient language, that Tulley begins to see a story form in the forgotten shadows of time, one that once breathed life, and should now be left alone.

Xander Tulley reaches a proverbial fork in the road, where he may learn more about himself than he ever cared to know; and where he will be faced with making the hardest decision he will ever have to make.

Stay tuned for more!

SW

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The Best Vampire Stories 1800 – 1849, A Classic Vampire Anthology, ed. by Andrew Barger, 2012

779A9A4F-987D-4214-83CF-A61CDD323C08Table of Contents

9 • With Teeth • essay by Andrew Barger
13 • The Vampyre • [Lord Ruthven] • (1970) • novelette by Dr. John William Polidori (variant of The Vampyre: A Tale 1819) [as by John Polidori]
41 • Wake Not the Dead • (1823) • novelette by Ludwig Tieck
71 • The Vampire of the Carpathian Mountains • [Les mille et un fantômes / A Thousand and One Phantoms] • novella by Alexandre Dumas (trans. of Les monts Carpathes 1965) [as by Alexander Dumas]
83 • Strange Event in the Life of Schalken the Painter • (1839) • novelette by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
111 • Pepopukin in Corsica • (1826) • short story by Arthur Young
133 • The Black Vampyre: A Legend of Saint Domingo • (1819) • short story by Robert C. Sands
163 • Clarimonde • (1882) • novelette by Théophile Gautier (trans. of La morte amoureuse 1836)